CALENDAR
  • Events Calendar

    December  2016
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    • Nov
      18

      Principal’s Message Vol.76 – Nov 2016

      Dear IslandCA Community, Buongiorno, Konnichiwa, 你好!

      It is such a pleasure to be writing the IslandCA Newsletter, whilst Debbie is away at camp with the Year 6 and 7 students. As this is my first newsletter, I thought I would share with you something that is close to my heart, and probably, to many of your hearts also! ―Being a Third Culture Child‖ or in my case a ―Third Culture Adult.

      As many of you know I am English and I was born in England. However, by the time I had reached 18, my family and I had lived in six places in four countries, I also attended international schools between the ages of four and nine, in Dubai and Abu Dhabi.

      Q: What is a ‘third culture kid’?
      A: Someone who grows up in a country or countries other than their own, as are many of the students at IslandCA.

      Q: What is the difference between a ‘third culture kid’ and someone who isn’t?
      A: Third Culture Kids are usually very comfortable meeting new people, moving to new places and they are often quite knowledgeable about the world. However as ―third culture kids‖ get older, they may find it more difficult to develop and keep meaningful friendships, as deep down they may be afraid of losing their friends. They may also find it hard to live in one place for a long time as they may become restless. They may feel ―different‖ to others around them, when they are not in an international or expatriate setting.

      Q: How can parents help when their children are growing up?
      A: It is important that the ―third culture kid‖ knows where they come from and that they have a connection with the place(s). For example, when I was growing up in the Middle East, we visited the same place in England every summer where we had a small bungalow. It is also good to talk to your children about being a ―third culture kid‖, and lastly, it is good to help and encourage your children to keep in touch with good friends by writing letters, sending emails or even Skyping.

      Q: What about moving back home?
      A: This can be challenging. It is important to try and keep up to date a little with local media, as this will help your children settle in more easily when they return home. I remember feeling left out of many conversations about children‖s television, as well as dressing and speaking differently.

      Q: Have there been any books written about ‘third culture kids’?
      A: Yes! ―Third Culture Kid‖ by David C Pollock and Ruth E Van Reken, ―Raising Global Nomads‖ by Robin Pascoe, ―Emotional Resilience and the Expat Child‖ by Julia Simens.
      On another note, it is only two more days to IslandCA‖s yearly Christmas Fair, and I am very much looking forward to seeing many of you there.

      Wishing you all a wonderful few weeks as we build up to this busy but very special time of the year.

      God Bless You,
      Charlie Owen, Vice Principal

      Nov
      4

      The Magical Christmas Jigsaw

      christmas-play-2016-new

      Island Christian Academy proudly presents:

      “The Magical Christmas Jigsaw”

      Venue: Youth Square
      Date: 6th December, 2016
      Time: 7:30pm
      Admission by tickets

      Nov
      4

      Principal’s Message Vol.75 – Nov 2016

      Dear IslandCA Community, Bonjour, Namaste, 你好!

      It has been nice to see so many parents in the school during the school day for a range of activities. The Generations Director of Learning held the last of this term’s three Coffee morning International Middle Years Curriculum (IMYC) sessions on Monday morning. Thank you to those who have attended these over the last few weeks. Some of the questions (and answers) that came up are included below:

      Q: How does IMYC prepare my child for subsequent studies?

      A: IMYC is a ‘Best of’ curriculum because it is based on commonalities of national curricula around the world. It is a great fit for our international students who will go on to other school systems in home countries, or stay here in Hong Kong. IMYC incorporates a focus on the skills necessary for success in the 21st Century, such as critical thinking, problem solving, collaboration and communication.

      Q: How will it work with specialist teachers in the Middle School?

      A: We will have subjects taught as specialist subjects by specialist teachers within a 21st Century learning environment. We expect our middle school to be small next year, with about 25 students, therefore we plan to start off with specialist teachers who have degrees across subjects, such as Maths and Science, or Language Arts and Geography.

      Q. What happens when my child finishes lower secondary school, year 9, at IslandCA – what are the options for year 10 if my child stays in Hong Kong?

      A: Supply of places exceeds demand in the upper secondary international schools in Hong Kong. A number of international schools (both well established and new) are keen to establish a relationship with IslandCA to take our students from IslandCA when they finish year 9. IMYC will prepare them well to be successful in a wide range of schools.

      Q: Will it be hard for a teacher to come in to IMYC new and teach it?

      A: We are hiring middle years qualified subject teachers who will bring their own unique experiences. Teachers will be blessed to have the substantial resources that come with IMYC membership (including Learning Goals, Learning Tasks, Assessment rubrics and Cross-curricular unit planning mind maps). Teachers are also required to attend IMYC training to become familiar with the curriculum.

      For those who were not at any of the meetings, we hope that this will give you a taste of the Middle Years programme at IslandCA. My thanks to Allison for conducting the meetings and answering the great questions that parents had.

      God Bless You,
      Debbie Middleton, Principal

    • Nov
      18

      Principal’s Message Vol.76 – Nov 2016

      Dear IslandCA Community, Buongiorno, Konnichiwa, 你好!

      It is such a pleasure to be writing the IslandCA Newsletter, whilst Debbie is away at camp with the Year 6 and 7 students. As this is my first newsletter, I thought I would share with you something that is close to my heart, and probably, to many of your hearts also! ―Being a Third Culture Child‖ or in my case a ―Third Culture Adult.

      As many of you know I am English and I was born in England. However, by the time I had reached 18, my family and I had lived in six places in four countries, I also attended international schools between the ages of four and nine, in Dubai and Abu Dhabi.

      Q: What is a ‘third culture kid’?
      A: Someone who grows up in a country or countries other than their own, as are many of the students at IslandCA.

      Q: What is the difference between a ‘third culture kid’ and someone who isn’t?
      A: Third Culture Kids are usually very comfortable meeting new people, moving to new places and they are often quite knowledgeable about the world. However as ―third culture kids‖ get older, they may find it more difficult to develop and keep meaningful friendships, as deep down they may be afraid of losing their friends. They may also find it hard to live in one place for a long time as they may become restless. They may feel ―different‖ to others around them, when they are not in an international or expatriate setting.

      Q: How can parents help when their children are growing up?
      A: It is important that the ―third culture kid‖ knows where they come from and that they have a connection with the place(s). For example, when I was growing up in the Middle East, we visited the same place in England every summer where we had a small bungalow. It is also good to talk to your children about being a ―third culture kid‖, and lastly, it is good to help and encourage your children to keep in touch with good friends by writing letters, sending emails or even Skyping.

      Q: What about moving back home?
      A: This can be challenging. It is important to try and keep up to date a little with local media, as this will help your children settle in more easily when they return home. I remember feeling left out of many conversations about children‖s television, as well as dressing and speaking differently.

      Q: Have there been any books written about ‘third culture kids’?
      A: Yes! ―Third Culture Kid‖ by David C Pollock and Ruth E Van Reken, ―Raising Global Nomads‖ by Robin Pascoe, ―Emotional Resilience and the Expat Child‖ by Julia Simens.
      On another note, it is only two more days to IslandCA‖s yearly Christmas Fair, and I am very much looking forward to seeing many of you there.

      Wishing you all a wonderful few weeks as we build up to this busy but very special time of the year.

      God Bless You,
      Charlie Owen, Vice Principal

      Nov
      4

      The Magical Christmas Jigsaw

      christmas-play-2016-new

      Island Christian Academy proudly presents:

      “The Magical Christmas Jigsaw”

      Venue: Youth Square
      Date: 6th December, 2016
      Time: 7:30pm
      Admission by tickets

      Nov
      4

      Principal’s Message Vol.75 – Nov 2016

      Dear IslandCA Community, Bonjour, Namaste, 你好!

      It has been nice to see so many parents in the school during the school day for a range of activities. The Generations Director of Learning held the last of this term’s three Coffee morning International Middle Years Curriculum (IMYC) sessions on Monday morning. Thank you to those who have attended these over the last few weeks. Some of the questions (and answers) that came up are included below:

      Q: How does IMYC prepare my child for subsequent studies?

      A: IMYC is a ‘Best of’ curriculum because it is based on commonalities of national curricula around the world. It is a great fit for our international students who will go on to other school systems in home countries, or stay here in Hong Kong. IMYC incorporates a focus on the skills necessary for success in the 21st Century, such as critical thinking, problem solving, collaboration and communication.

      Q: How will it work with specialist teachers in the Middle School?

      A: We will have subjects taught as specialist subjects by specialist teachers within a 21st Century learning environment. We expect our middle school to be small next year, with about 25 students, therefore we plan to start off with specialist teachers who have degrees across subjects, such as Maths and Science, or Language Arts and Geography.

      Q. What happens when my child finishes lower secondary school, year 9, at IslandCA – what are the options for year 10 if my child stays in Hong Kong?

      A: Supply of places exceeds demand in the upper secondary international schools in Hong Kong. A number of international schools (both well established and new) are keen to establish a relationship with IslandCA to take our students from IslandCA when they finish year 9. IMYC will prepare them well to be successful in a wide range of schools.

      Q: Will it be hard for a teacher to come in to IMYC new and teach it?

      A: We are hiring middle years qualified subject teachers who will bring their own unique experiences. Teachers will be blessed to have the substantial resources that come with IMYC membership (including Learning Goals, Learning Tasks, Assessment rubrics and Cross-curricular unit planning mind maps). Teachers are also required to attend IMYC training to become familiar with the curriculum.

      For those who were not at any of the meetings, we hope that this will give you a taste of the Middle Years programme at IslandCA. My thanks to Allison for conducting the meetings and answering the great questions that parents had.

      God Bless You,
      Debbie Middleton, Principal